About Us

Amanda Day

Like every grant guru, Amanda Day, GPC, fell into the field through no fault of her own. She quickly discovered that grants totally fit her personality and skills, so 18 years later she’s still writing, managing, and training with the best of them.


Her skill set lies in federal and state funding, particularly for government agencies. Amanda is currently a grant consultant, as well as a trainer for Grant Writing USA. She earned her GPC in 2010, a member of the inaugural class of GPCs (Grant Professional Certified).


She spent 14 years employed full time as a grants administrator for local governments, including a long stint with the City of Alpharetta. During her tenure there, she secured more than $20 million in federal and state funding for a variety of local government needs, including transportation infrastructure, outdoor recreation, first responder equipment, recycling programs, and stormwater improvements.


Amanda currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Grant Professionals Association as the Vice President. She’s a past President of the Grant Professionals Certification Institute. She’s also a member of the Georgia Grant Professionals Association where she serves as the Chair of the Southern Regional Grant Conference.


She is a graduate of Southwest Baptist University with a BS in Communications and Psychology. Amanda is married with two kids, a concert junkie, and avid reader.

Kimberly Hays de Muga

Kimberly Hays de Muga, GPC, is an expert grant professional, fundraiser and trainer. Her 20 years of fundraising experience includes raising more than $30 million from individuals, foundations and corporations for human service non-profits—everything from mobile food pantries to interfaith children’s camps to general operating support for the largest pediatric hospital in the Southeast. She was the Development Director at the Frazer Center from 2014-2018 where she worked to connect people to the early childhood education programs that include children with disabilities and to the job training and supported employment activities for adults with disabilities. Previously, she was the Senior Manager for Foundation and Corporate Relations at the Atlanta Community Food Bank for seven years. Prior to that, Kimberly was a senior grant writer for the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Foundation for 10 years.

Kimberly is co-author of Preparing for the GPC Exam: Earn Your Grant Professional Certified Credential published by the Charity Channel Press. She is a trainer in grant writing and grant management for Grant Writing USA, and has presented fundraising and grant development seminars and workshops to small and medium non-profits across North Georgia that fight hunger, and is a popular speaker at national and regional conferences of the Grant Professionals Association. Currently serving on the Board of Directors of the Grant Professionals Association, she is past Board Chair of the Grant Professionals Foundation and a past president of the Georgia Chapter of the Grant Professionals Association.

Kimberly is fluent in Spanish as a Returned Peace Corp Volunteer, where she lived in a farming community in rural Dominican Republic and saw first-hand how communities can come together for the common good. She has a BA in Journalism from the University of Georgia, and studied Public Health at Emory University. Her passion is coaching and training non-profits and funders toward successful fundraising that better serves their communities.

WHY WE STARTED THIS PODCAST

We started this venture because we love what we do. We love helping people find funding in order to make the world a better place.

We both live in the metro Atlanta area, and like most high-density metropolitans, people round here spend a lot of time in their cars. We discovered the world of podcasts and the benefits of having a portable, sometimes funny, means to learn and grow no matter where you are (including in your car). We tried to find a grant or fundraising-related podcast so we can learn on the go, but did not find what we were looking for. Our solution to this problem was to create our own.

We have known each other for years. While we are varied in our backgrounds, experience, and personalities (Amanda is a total extrovert and Kimberly a total introvert), together we can cover a lot of territory to help you navigate the world of grants and fundraising, from a multi-million-dollar federal grant to that small hometown family foundation.

WHO WE ARE

We are a dynamic duo bringing you insight and knowledge into the ever-evolving world of grants, development, and fundraising. Full disclosure: we’re southern. You may hear a y’all. It happens.

WE ARE HERE TO HELP

Be a winner by avoiding these top 10 pitfalls in grant writing.

  1. Poor fit – Your request does not align with the funding priorities of the grantor.
  2. Guidelines not adhered to – If the page limit is 20, submitting 21 pages is cause to be turned down from consideration for funding.
  3. Timing – If the deadline is March 1 at 3pm, make sure your application doesn’t arrive at 3:01pm.
  4. All requested information not provided – Make sure you include all necessary attachments and answer all questions.
  5. Duplication of service – If every city around you already has a mobile command center, your chances of getting one too are slim.
  6. Blanket proposals or fishing expeditions – Keep your request focused.
  7. Sustainability not shown – Grant money only lasts for a short period; make sure your project/program has the ability to continue beyond the life of the grant.
  8. Unrealistic expectations – Make sure your budget and time frame are both realistic. Better to scale down a project to make it fit the grant requirements than take on more than you can handle.
  9. Inaccurate, vague writing and poor presentation – Inaccuracies in your budget totals, spelling mistakes, and grammar errors may seem small, but they show your attention to detail.
  10. No donor recognition – Many donors, particularly corporate donors, will want to know how their contribution will be appreciated or recognized. Overlooking this is one of the most common and easy-to-avoid errors.